Discovery of Gravitational Waves. What does this mean??

CI Admin  ,  14 Feb 2016 commentsComments (0)

People around the world cheered on Feb 11th morning when scientists announced the first direct detection of gravitational waves. — ripples in the fabric of space-time whose existence was first proposed by Albert Einstein, in 1916.
 
If you could see [gravitational waves], you can see back past where you can’t see with physical light. Wouldn't that be cool ??
 
 
 
Introduction: (Courtesy : Wikipedia)
 
In physics, gravitational waves are ripples in the curvature of spacetime which propagate as waves, travelling outward from the source. Predicted in 1916 by Albert Einstein on the basis of his theory of general relativity, gravitational waves transport energy as gravitational radiation.
 
The existence of gravitational waves is a possible consequence of the Lorentz invariance of general relativity since it brings the concept of a finite speed of propagation of the physical interactions with it. By contrast, gravitational waves cannot exist in the Newtonian theory of gravitation, which postulates that physical interactions propagate at infinite speed.
 
In Einstein's theory of general relativity, gravity is treated as a phenomenon resulting from the curvature of spacetime. This curvature is caused by the presence of mass. Generally, the more mass that is contained within a given volume of space, the greater the curvature of spacetime will be at the boundary of this volume. As objects with mass move around in spacetime, the curvature changes to reflect the changed locations of those objects. In certain circumstances, accelerating objects generate changes in this curvature, which propagate outwards at the speed of light in a wave-like manner. These propagating phenomena are known as gravitational waves.
 
As a gravitational waves passes a distant observer, that observer will find spacetime distorted by the effects of strain. Distances between free objects increase and decrease rhythmically as the wave passes, at a frequency corresponding to that of the wave. This occurs despite such free objects never being subjected to an unbalanced force. The magnitude of this effect decreases inversely with distance from the source. Inspiralling binary neutron stars are predicted to be a powerful source of gravitational waves as they coalesce, due to the very large acceleration of their masses as they orbit close to one another. However, due to the astronomical distances to these sources the effects when measured on Earth are predicted to be very small, having strains of less than 1 part in 1020. Scientists have demonstrated the existence of these waves with ever more sensitive detectors. The most sensitive detector accomplished the task possessing a sensitivity measurement of about one part in 5×1022 (as of 2012) provided by the LIGO and VIRGO observatories. A space based observatory, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, is currently under development by ESA.
 
People around the world cheered on Feb 11th morning when scientists announced the first direct detection of gravitational waves. — ripples in the fabric of space-time whose existence was first proposed by Albert Einstein, in 1916.
 
What does this mean ??
 
If you look with visible light as far as we can look in the universe, the universe is no longer transparent, it becomes opaque. There’s nothing you can do about that.
 
If you could see [gravitational waves], you can see back past where you can’t see with physical light. Wouldn't that be cool. We’d have direct access to something that’s farther away than we can hope to see otherwise.
 
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